pantryslut: (Default)
Sorry for the delay, got married in the middle there.

I am currently reading Sacco and Vanzetti Must Die! by Mark Binelli, because Mark Binelli is my favorite writer of the moment (although I am about to exhaust his body of work) and because S&VMD is aimed right at my sensibilities. When it begins, Sacco and Vanzetti are not the S&V of our world, but rather a pre-WW2 comedy duo, a la Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello, etc. The text consists of narrative descriptions of scenes from their movies as if the scenes had actually happened in real life; critical material about said movies; and other "supplementary material" of various sorts, from interviews to diary pages to footnotes. Then things get weirder and the story of the other S&V, the ones we know, starts to bleed through. In the meantime, lots of stuff touching on knife-sharpening (Binelli's family were knife-sharpeners who emigrated from Italy to Detroit, fwiw), pre-war radical politics, pre-war Hollywood (S&V are pallbearers at Valentino's funeral, for example), pre-war Italy and America, theories of comedy and tragedy, and so on. I love this book so hard. It's Binelli's first novel, pre-dating both the Detroit book and the Screamin' Jay Hawkins book I read earlier this year, but so far it's not showing any signs of first-novel awkwardness. Here's hoping it stays the course.

This week's earworm, and the week before's:

The Girl from Ipanema
http://www.sfweekly.com/music/all-shook-down/earworm-weekly-girl-ipanema-stan-getz-astrud-gilberto/

The Ghost in You
http://www.sfweekly.com/music/all-shook-down/earworm-weekly/earworm-weekly-psychedelic-furs-ghost/
pantryslut: (Default)
I read [livejournal.com profile] nihilistic_kid's "I am Providence" this week. Speedily, because I am not good at enduring the suspense of whodunits. It was sharply funny, chewier than your usual detective book, and pretty accurate about the seamier side of con culture, indeed.

What's next? No idea!

I watched "Home," the movie based off the book "The True Meaning of Smekday," and was disappointed. Too bad; I'd heard it was possibly an overlooked gem, but in fact it's pretty blah, and (as far as I can tell so far) not very true to the book. Also, please forgive me but I hated the voice work of Jim Parsons.

Earworm Weekly this time around is on Robyn Hitchcock.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/08/09/earworm-weekly-i-feel-beautiful-by-robyn-hitchcock
pantryslut: (Default)
I finally ditched Planet for Rent. The reasons were plentiful: thin characters, too much undifferentiated first-person narration, three chapters with the exact same plot structure of "human interacts with much more powerful alien patron/adversary, realizes their utter puniness in the grand scheme of things, then -- a twist! Usually involving selling out to the aliens for capital gain and further loss of autonomy." Also, he sunk the continent of Africa, an unbearable cliche.

Smekday, on the other hand, remains highly entertaining.

This week's earworm is Seals and Crofts' "Get Closer." Ray Parker Jr. of Ghostbusters fame plays guitar on this track, though it may take multiple listens to notice it beneath the spackle of strings and piano.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/08/02/earworm-weekly-seals-and-crofts-get-closer
pantryslut: (Default)
I am back to reading Yoss' "Planet for Rent" and also, for the kids, "The True Meaning of Smekday." Thus it is that I am immersed in anxiety about aliens colonizing the Earth and the effects thereof, which of course is really just thinly-disguised anxiety about either a) what we did to the people we colonized right here historically without leaving the planet, and/or b) what said people we colonized might do to us if the tables were turned. Compare and contrast! I guess the main difference is that Yoss is, so far, filled with sexual obsessions, while "Smekday," being a kids' book, not so much. But actually the sexual fixations get a little old so I'm enjoying "Smekday" a little bit more. It might just be that reading the Boov dialog out loud is awesome, while Yoss' broken English is actually broken Spanish, translated, and may as a result have lost some of its subtle charms.

I wrote about the song "Bad Day" for my column this week.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/07/26/earworm-weekly-daniel-powters-bad-day
pantryslut: (Default)
I started "Between the World and Me" this week, coincidentally aligning with the Republican National Convention spectacle. It was kind of disturbing, actually, to read Coates' discussion of The [American] Dream and its costs while all that was going on. Exhibit A on display.

I had some drama around my column this week. But it got posted. Tagged and Tweeted and everything too.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/07/19/earworm-weekly-ghostbusters-by-ray-parker-jr
pantryslut: (Default)
I just started "Planet for Rent" by Yoss, a Cuban science fiction writer who is also in a heavy metal band. (Awesome author photo. Gold star.) This his is older novel; his newer one, just released, is "Super Extra Grande" but I wanted to read this one first. So far, it's interesting in concept and a little clunky in execution, which is about what I expected. I mean, it's no clunkier than a lot of other contemporary SF.

The last two chapters of "Detroit City is the Place to Be" (before the double afterwords) are about "ruin porn" and the high art world's engagement with the Detroit landscape (sometimes versus its people, who are still there, as many people seem to conveniently forget). There is a lot to grapple with, and Binelli does it more justice than I have seen elsewhere. Man, it's some bleak shit in the end, though.

Earworm is here: http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/07/12/earworm-weekly-she-drives-me-crazy-by-fine-young-cannibals
pantryslut: (Default)
(well, if you take into account the three-hour time shift, anyway.)

Reading and listening are the same this week: I just finished Mark Binelli's second novel, "Screamin' Jay Hawkins' Greatest Hits." As I note in my music column (see below), the title is a joke, since technically Hawkins had zero hits, and only one song he's really known for. But "I Put a Spell On You" is a pretty big signature tune, man.

Binelli, you may notice, is also the author of "Detroit City Is The Place To Be," the book I have been reading up to this point. I was impressed enough by his nonfiction to give his fiction a spin. And I liked this book enough that I am going to check out his first novel, "Sacco and Vanzetti Must Die." Binelli is "experimental" to mainstream reading audiences and only mildly odd to indie readers; sure, "Greatest Hits" is not entirely linear and features a ghost, a theatrical monologue and a re-imagining of "Jailhouse Rock" starring Hawkins instead of Elvis (not all in one scene, though), taking care to note that Hawkins actually went to jail. But the writing itself is pretty straightforward, which I appreciate. It's a surprisingly subtle and thoughtful novel. Don't put too much stock into the cover blurbs about how it's talking about race in surprising new ways, though. All it really means is that Binelli is a white guy who doesn't collapse the complexities of a black man who loved opera, fathered dozens of illegitimate children, performed wearing a bone in his nose, and titled one of his albums "Black Music For White People." Which does make it a cut above the rest, I suppose.

The ending chapter is perfect.

The earworm is here:

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/07/05/earworm-weekly-the-many-versions-of-screamin-jay-hawkins-i-put-a-spell-on-you
pantryslut: (Default)
But don't expect it to last, b/c next week I will be in Hawaii (!).

Still reading Detroit City, which is still a fine book. I should be finished with it soon. As far as chapter books with the kids go, I'm currently reading them a charming little YA mystery called Enchantment Lake.: A Northwoods Mystery. (https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/enchantment-lake) It's set in a small lakeside community in northern Minnesota, one that can only be reached by boat and only intermittently possesses electricity and is full of aging, eccentric residents. But the demographics are changing, someone's building a road and maybe a golf course, and suddenly a lot of "accidents" are claiming the lives of the older generation. Francie, an aspiring actress who briefly played a teenage detective on TV, comes back to help her elderly aunts discover what's really going on.

Published by University of Minnesota Press, this was written by someone who, you can tell, is intimately familiar with the northern Midwestern landscape. I've never been up to northern Minnesota, but my family used to have a house on a lake in southern Michigan (near Cassopolis). Not a vacation house; my own elderly relations lived there year-round -- the whole Filley family, whom the Selkes intermarried with, had 3-4 houses all next to each other, if I recall correctly, and the local access road is still named after them -- and we'd go to visit on weekends. So all the little details keep making me shiver with delight. (The peat bog! The midnight fishing for walleye, using leeches as bait! Jigsaw puzzles you've done so many times before that you try it without the reference photo to make it more challenging! Birch trees!) I am not entirely sure the kids are as entertained as I am, but they seem to enjoy Francie and her dotty aunts (are they sisters? a couple? does it matter?), and the writing is sprightly enough to keep their attention. It's too bad this book didn't get more attention -- I plucked it from the returns cart at work -- because it's really quite well-crafted and more satisfying than the usual YA mystery fluff. At least so far.

Meanwhile, I wrote about Prince again: http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/06/28/earworm-weekly-lets-pretend-were-married-by-prince
pantryslut: (Default)
Detroit City: I had forgotten how colorful Coleman Young was. "Swearing is an art form. You can express yourself much more exactly, much more succinctly, with properly used curse words."



Earworms:

Queen: http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/06/14/earworm-weekly-we-will-rock-you-by-queen

Katy Perry: http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/06/21/earworm-weekly-firework-by-katy-perry
pantryslut: (Default)
Still reading Detroit City is The Place to Be. It's still great. More soon.
pantryslut: (Default)
I grew up in Michigan, about two hours away from Detroit and four hours away from Chicago. My father's family still lived in Chicago, and I didn't drive, so my pull was always toward the other side of Lake Michigan -- unlike much of the rest of my hometown, who would head to Detroit regularly for concerts or other daytrips. Still, like many folks I have a soft spot for Detroit. And also a little better grasp of the city's true history. (But only a little.)

I just started reading Mark Binelli's Detroit City Is The Place To Be and already I am damn impressed. Maybe it's the part where he compares 1920s Detroit to the Bay Area (he says Silicon Valley, but his book is a few years old and the Valley had not completed its takeover of points north and east). He didn't intend that passage to resonate like it does to me, reading now, but he has a very large and sobering point.

But there's lots of other good stuff too, and I look forward to reading it.

Speaking of Detroit, this week's earworm column is on the Spinners (known as the Detroit Spinners in the UK).

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/06/07/earworm-weekly-ill-be-around-by-the-spinners

P.S. I stumbled across Binelli's book because of his most recent publication, Screamin' Jay Hawkins' All-Time Greatest Hits, which looks to be a very interesting novel and is on order for me at work. Binelli's first novel, btw, was Sacco and Venzetti Must Die, which also looks interesting and ambitious.
pantryslut: (Default)
This week I reveal a possible origin of my music critic so-called career, through the medium of a bus trip to Canada and an earworm of a U2 song.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/05/24/earworm-weekly-u2s-the-unforgettable-fire

I took a short break from H is for Hawk to read Little Labors by Rivka Galchen. Little Labors is a little book. It is consciously modeled on The Pillow Book by Sei Sh┼Źnagon, and it is about early motherhood, motherhood with a pre-verbal baby. I love everything about it. The discussions of babies in literature and art. The discussions of the absence of women in American literature versus English literature, something I was ranting about just the other day *before* I read that particular passage -- how I cannot remember a single woman author I read in high school American Literature classes, and only a handful from college. Galchen also turns to genre literature -- crime and mysteries -- and specifically mentions contemporary how many contemporary Japanese crime writers are women, both bits of which reminded me of a conversation I had with [identity profile] nihilistic-kid.livejournal.com once. Also a discussion of the trendiness of the color orange, Sei Sh┼Źnagon herself, and loads of other tasty stuff, including pithy one-liners about other people's children, for example. The miscellany form is so ridiculously well-suited to the material of early motherhood that I am mildly appalled that this is more or less the only book I know that uses it, although structure of The Argonauts is similar. Little Labors may be little, but it's making a big argument about motherhood and writing, albeit doing so obliquely, in a very Pillow Book sort of way if you get my drift, a very subtle, clever, pointed but never full-frontal way.
pantryslut: (Default)
We have lost all sense of time and space, it has become clear. We are floating free of calendar squares, timelines, appointment reminders. We have transcended chronological expectations. Strange, since we are still a creature of deadlines in our other life, as well as shift work. We have an alarm on our cell phone that goes off once a day -- two to three times, if you incorporate the snooze function into your calculations. But calculations are just another form of ordering, and ordinal regimen is what we have detached from somehow. Time, we are told, is an illusion, time on the Internet doubly so. Tilt your head and we may all gain a glimpse of infinity.

Or I could just be turning into a terminal flake.

Probably there are other mitigating factors, like fatigue -- I am so fucking tired, it's near the end of the school year, I now tutor on Wednesdays instead of Fridays, etc. Anyway, I am here now, with you, and I have been reading the best-selling, award-winning H is for Hawk.

My God, this is such a good book. I knew about the grief over her father's unexpected death and the training of the hawk; I did not know about the delicate discussion of T.H. White and his sexuality (and the remarks about closeted homosexual British nature writers in general), nor the class implications of falconry, nor her prickly yet endearing self-consciousness about the whole endeavor, which is part and parcel of her talent for the careful observation of particularities. And the writing is beautiful.

This week's earworm: Alicia Keys torments me.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/05/17/earworm-weekly-alicia-keys-if-i-aint-got-you
pantryslut: (Default)
I've been on heavy deadlines, and then recovering from deadlines, and so I've been absent hereabouts for a bit. Now I'm back with a spot of time (OK, procrastinating on another deadline), and even though it's Monday I thought I'd take a moment to catch up on the reading and things.

I sailed through "Bullies: A Friendship" by Alex Abramovich. Its title doesn't give much of a clue what it's about, but the cover does: it features a man displaying his East Bay Rats back tattoo to the camera. Abramovich discovers that his childhood bully, Trevor Latham, is now head of the EBR motorcycle club, on the other side of the country, and reaches out to him. Abramovich ends up relocating to Oakland for a spell to hang out with Latham and his buddies at the clubhouse on San Pablo and also explore a city in the grips of rapid change -- we get chapters dedicated to Chauncey Bailey's murder and Occupy Oakland, whose denouement coincides with the book's. Abramovich I think unfairly dismisses East Oakland as fairly uninteresting, but that's the biggest flaw. It's an interesting culture-clash narrative, definitely worth reading.

ETA: and here's a nice interview with Abramovich published in Vogue, of all places, that gives more insight into the book: http://www.vogue.com/13411297/alex-abramovich-bullies-interview/

I also just finished "Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen" by Mary Norris, a copy editor at the New Yorker. It's a mixture of memoir, language history, and grammar lessons; I didn't learn much new grammar but I did learn some interesting history, and the memoir bits were charming. I will say that she hits a good balance of prescriptive and descriptive, which you kind of have to when your day-job is enforcing the idiosyncratic standards of the New Yorker. If I did trigger and/or content warnings, I would say that the chapter on Norris' sibling's transition and the linguistic perils thereof was rough reading, but I appreciate her honesty even if she does give herself a cookie at the end. Overall, it's a good insight as to what working in a copy department is actually like.


Some music columns that you may have missed:

Meghan Trainor, "All About That Bass"
http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/05/03/earworm-weekly-all-about-that-bass-by-meghan-trainor

The Bangles, "Manic Monday"
http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/04/26/earworm-weekly-the-bangles-manic-monday
pantryslut: (Default)
Those of you who have heard my tales of attending the AVN Awards will remember me talking about the Planet of the Porn People, b/c porn stars are all like 5 feet high and change and I felt like I was a true giantess walking among them.

Prince, of course, was legendarily short, and legendarily sexy. I will let you draw your own conclusions here.
pantryslut: (Default)
Beck and geek chic: http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/04/12/earworm-weekly-becks-new-pollution

Almost done with Black Deutschland. What a fantastic book. Along the way I also read Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, which is super-cute and stars G.'s new favorite comic book character, incidentally.
pantryslut: (Default)
Earworm Weekly: "Army Dreamers."

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/04/06/earworm-weekly-kate-bushs-army-dreamers

Still reading and enjoying the heck out of "Black Deutschland." Harold Washington has just died. So many memories became unburied while reading through this section.
pantryslut: (Default)
I had complete intention to post this yesterday, down to opening the window and tucking it away to wait until after I turned in my deliverable to a client. And then after I turned it in, I turned to toast. Now I am no longer toast, so here is my weekly installment.

This week's Earworm Weekly: Hell is other people's earworms.

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/03/29/earworm-weekly-hell-by-squirrel-nut-zippers

Reading-wise, I occasionally wonder, in that reflexively self-critical sort of way, whether my standards are too high when it comes to reading, whether I am cutting myself off from some sort of satisfying if fluffy sort of sport reading that almost everybody else in the world (who still reads) seems to enjoy.

And then I pick up a book like Black Deutschland and I think, no. My high standards mean I make room in my schedule for a novel like this, a little off the beaten path but finely executed and endlessly entertaining. I mean, Chicago and Berlin in the 80s, a young gay black protagonist, snark about high-theory architecture. It's delicious and arch and chewy too, and filled with all manner of odd but utterly realistic characters. I am a happy reader this week.

I'm also reading the kids The Cheshire Cheese Cat, an animal fable set in a pub frequented by Charles Dickens and contemporaries. All of the literary references fly over my children's heads, but the interplay between the cats, mice, and a raven from the Tower of London keep them busy while I chortle to myself.
pantryslut: (Default)
Earworm Weekly, Neneh Cherry version:

http://www.sfweekly.com/shookdown/2016/03/22/earworm-weekly-neneh-cherrys-buffalo-stance

Reading-wise, I am almost finished with The Kitchen Counter Cooking School, which despite the flaws I outlined last week was quite charming, if not particularly enlightening for someone like me. Not enlightening but nonetheless inspiring, as I try to cook down my overstuffed freezer and get a better handle on my weekly menu planning considering that I'm now working three nights a week, give or take, usually just after we get our weekly box o' produce.

OK, maybe a little enlightening. Let me put it this way: my pantry's got nothing on some of these folks who *don't* cook.

Profile

pantryslut: (Default)
pantryslut

August 2016

S M T W T F S
 12 3456
789 10111213
14151617181920
2122232425 2627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 28th, 2016 08:33 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios